Summative Assessment: PDP & Key Posts

IMG_8478 PDP:

Throughout the three years of my degree, the sensibility and commonality to the themes I have invested my time in, context, process and development wise, has given me an artist identity, for which I intend to further develop throughout my career.

Although exploring where craft sits within the fine art spectrum is a well-trodden narrative for those within the field of ceramics, my work tries to fit ‘an intervening space’, a description coined by Jorunn Veiteberg in her book Craft in Transition (2005). A space between function and non-fuction, tradition and breaking with tradition, craftmasnhip-based art and idea-based art, while commenting on early 18th porcelain vessels, time, process, corruptions, formal and iconographic, as they reaseess the historical, social, political and aesthetic values of the decorative object and how it is displayed.

My dissertation was an insight into the history of ceramics within the last century and this research fed into my subject work, contextually but most importantly I can see with more clarity where my practice fits within the wider spectrum.

This particular year has gone past in a heart beat. The first term allowed us to develop our material understanding and in a way I wish I could have taken the opportunity to its fullest potential, although I managed to explore some exciting technical processes involving fluxes which fed into my final work. In addition, the Ceramic Auction took a chunk of our time in that first term, juggling that with the dissertation plus making and research time was a struggle but so much has been learned from that experience  (organising and managing a team, networking, IT skills, communication, photographing, marketing) which I would definitely do again. Oh the stress, ok, probably not again. But on a serious note, meeting so many makers including, probably a once in a life opportunity Pippin Drysdale, has been a highlight and having a supportive team especially Marek and Morgan behind this project just made it easier.

Having Johnathan Clarkson lecture series was essential for my contextual development for my exhibition. Considering the setting, the use of the plinth, still life, and how the whole experience needs to be considered has made me more aware of the curation of my final work and helped me make essential decisions.

Professional Practice enabled me to vigorously build upon my own strengths and interests and for me to make analytical judgments which will affect the ways in which the public will understand and read my work, ultimately influencing my career, by building a higher level of intellectual knowledge and calling into the core of my work.

I feel that my degree experience throughout has informed me towards the next stage of my life. I am delighted to have gained a spot in Inc. Space as I will gain further entrepreneurial  skills whilst continuing with my art practice. I am hoping by having the degree show soon and exhibiting at New Designers and Art in Clay Hatfield will open new doors to exhibitions, possible career paths.

Very excited for what the future holds.

Contextualization of Practice:

Towards Incongruence, Interpreting Ceramics

Early 18th century PorcelainOde to Tradition

Place and Practice

Ceramics for the Home/Gallery/Museum

Still LifeMia E GöranssonRachel Whiteread

Process of Development:

Starting Point – Warping Porcelain Pot as a Catalyst

Experimenting with Terracotta and its Status

Additions to Clay

Fluxes

Working Towards the Exhibition and its Curation

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Working Towards the Exhibition and its Curation

 

Just before Easter, with deadline fast approaching, I had to compile a body of work to exhibit. However, in my head not having a clarity of what specifically to exhibit was a bit daunting but at the same time liberating and a freedom for which I was able to take advantage of.

Being able to just construct a body of work with some sort of idea that a dealine was approaching made me want to make as much as I could within that time frame, with the power then at the end to select from and explore compositions for the final set up. Possibly having a singular piece, a few or a mass of all of them. All thought through the making stage.

I compiled a tremendous amount of research through my research and development stage and visited places like the Victoria & Albert MuseumNational Museum Cardiff and their compressive ceramic collections, St Fagans National Museum of History and its more domestic and rustic displays and Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum‘s stately home, showcase of porcelain, ranging all in contextual study.

 

From a early start I wanted to include an indication of the home, and where ceramics sits within that context away from the more conventional white plinth and white cube setting. I looked quite intensively on charity shops and online platforms, and loads of auctions were lost but managed to get a 1940-1950s sideboard with some lovely dark wood which would compliment my porcelain and terracotta vessels. 32314126_1939423542737463_4719799416238637056_n

Didn’t want the sideboard as a plinth, but an extension to the whole narrative between where by work sits and the defiance of those definitions. A dialogue which could not only inform my practice but memories to be evoked by the viewer.

I was constatly working on composition which could be part of the sideboard and coming out of it, working with the architecture of the CSAD building. Referencing people like Edmund De Waal, Morandi, Johannes Nagel, Mia E Göransson, Betty Woodman, Anders Ruhwald, Ron Nagle, Andrew Lord, Takuro Kuwata and Tommaso Corvi-Mora (to name a few).

 

Exploring compositions which where clearly stating the still life towards the reference of ginger jars and their historical context.  Originally, ginger jars were used for storing and transporting spices in Ancient China. They were used as containers for salt, oil but also rarer spices such as ginger, hence the name they got when they began entering the Western world. Their utilitarian purpose was replaced in time by a decorative one.

 

Similarly using plates, moving away from the rituals of their utilitarian context and moving towards the more decorative status. I must say snapchat was a massive help using these collage feature to visualise them on the wall. Initially, I made the plates with deep foots so I would hang them from bits of timber of the wall but then realised I really had hand them with DISC stickers.

But my problems were just accumulating, with plates being broken and cracking from fast drying and firings not going well, I still managed to work around it and fix things by either adding fluxes to cracks, making it a feature or separating pots as they kissed inside the kiln and re-firing.

 

But managed to build an extensive body of work which I was happy with and had to play around with glaze, ready for curation.

 

Final Set Up:

10May2018-IMG_7742IMG_8438IMG_8353IMG_8347IMG_8456IMG_8430IMG_8469IMG_8190IMG_8461IMG_8403IMG_8366IMG_8298IMG_8291IMG_8423IMG_8446IMG_8354IMG_8413IMG_8415IMG_8361IMG_8478IMG_8285IMG_8287IMG_8206

The lay out of these images in a way is how I hope the viewer will travel or at least predict how they are going to observe it. Having the work right as you come in is such a privileged spot which I could not just not consider it carefully and the way I curated, I hope it demonstrates that. Firstly, you come in and have a look at the whole picture, looking at the plates down to the still life on the sideboard. This could lead your eyes to observe the terracotta gathering through to peak what is inside the sideboard, down to the plate on the floor with a glaze gather from the handle, followed by the container on the floor back up to the hanged plates. Perhaps you would go away to look at the other stuff, in the meanwhile the viewer might take the stairs and come across the drop of glaze on the floor and lead them to the plate on the stairs, if not, I hope they might notice if they are throughout the floors and look down to the heart space as you can literally see the work from all the floors. But the intention is not solely in the need for the work to be discovered. Finally, the viewer might be coming down the stairs again and notice the two porcelain vessels by the window, which in turn might make them spot and have a final look at the composition.

In a way the curation, has a sort of responsibility to consider the architecture of the CSAD building carefully, and I think I managed to do so. Initially, not knowing where I was going to be and how many pieces I was exhibiting has lead me to be quite experimental through my making, which allowed me to be more selective about the work in show.

My final work I definitely a continuum debate I have been having throughout my degree, and most probably will develop throughout the years. The term that Jorunn Vieterberg coined, ‘An Intervening Space’ is something that has resonated with me and my work explores in a way a space between function and non-fuction, tradition and breaking with tradition, craftmasnhip-based art and idea-based art, while commenting on early 18th porcelain vessels, time, status, politics, identity and process.

Questions raised by this discourse resonate through my practice, a fusion of coil building and levels of flux cause the boundary of each form to literally oscillate as if in response to attempts at fixed definition.

Artist Statement

It has been common to describe craft’s position as a borderline area between fine art and design. I prefer to call this area an ‘intervening space’ or, to be more precise, the space between function and non-function, tradition and breaking with tradition, craftsmanship-based art and idea-based art.

Jorunn Veiteberg

In the modern and post-modern periods, the home has been both an important and an undervalued location for encountering art, particularly ceramics. Important because the domestic space is the traditional site for encountering it, and undervalued because of connotations of craft belonging to the female sphere, a place of utility, of low financial value, and small scale to enable it’s display within the home.

Questions raised by this discourse resonate through my practice, a fusion of coil building and levels of flux cause the boundary of each form to literally oscillate as if in response to attempts at fixed definition.

Artist Curriculum Vitae

Toni De Jesus 

tonidejesus.ceramics@gmail.com

07745309393

www.tonidejesus.com

Instagram: @tonidjesus

 

Artist statement

It has been common to describe craft’s position as a borderline area between fine art and design. I prefer to call this area an ‘intervening space’ or, to be more precise, the space between function and non-function, tradition and breaking with tradition, craftsmanship-based art and idea-based art.

Jorunn Veiteberg

In the modern and post-modern periods, the home has been both an important and an undervalued location for encountering art, particularly ceramics. Important because the domestic space is the traditional site for encountering it, and undervalued because of connotations of craft belonging to the female sphere, a place of utility, of low financial value, and small scale to enable it’s display within the home.

Questions raised by this discourse resonate through my practice, a fusion of coil building and levels of flux cause the boundary of each form to literally oscillate as if in response to attempts at fixed definition.

Education

2015-2018, Cardiff Metropolitan University, BA (HONS) Ceramics, pending

2013-2014, City College Brighton and Hove, UAL Level 3 Diploma in Art and Design – Foundation Studies (QCF), Distinction

2008-2013, Ifield Community College, A-levels (Fine Art(A), Ceramics(A), Mathematics (C)), BTECs (Applied Science (QCF) (Distinction*), ICT Practitioners (Pass), Sport (QCF) (Pass)), 5 GCSEs (A*-C)

Experience: (Jobs and Volunteering)

2017-2018, Ceramic Auction, Organising and Managing team and Cardiff Metropolitan University Instagram Takeover, Cardiff Metropolitan University

2017, Art in Clay, Volunteer, Hatfield

2017, International Ceramic Festival, Volunteer, Aberystwyth

2017, Cardiff School of Art and Design Degree Show, Cardiff Metropolitan University Instagram Takeover

2017, Ceramics and Art Auction, Videographer and Cardiff Metropolitan University Instagram Takeover

2016, Made by Hand, Volunteer, Cardiff

2015, Made in Roath, Volunteer, Cardiff

2014-2015Anna Barlow, Intern, London

June 2011, Teaching Assistant/Technician, Ceramic Department, Ifield Comunnity College

March 2013 – present, Pret A Manger, Hot Chef, Gatwick South Terminal

Group Exhibitions

2017, A Growing Exhibition, Incspot Arts and Crafts Centre, Cardiff

2017, Ceramic Exhibition, Ken Stradling Collection, Bristol

2016, Överföra, IKEA, Cardiff

2016, There’s many a slip twixed cup & lip, Oriel 2, Craft in the Bay, Cardiff

2013, A-level Summer Exhibition Online, Shortlisted for Gathering, Royal Academy of Arts

Upcoming Exhibitions

2018, Cardiff School of Art and Design Degree Show, Cardiff

2018, New Designers Part 1, London

2018, Art in Clay, Hatfield

Residencies and other projects

2017, Global Perspectives, South Korea

2017, LaPedrix Ceramic Studio, France

2016, Pop up play – Forest of Plinths, Open-call group commission with budget of £1,200, Wales

Awards

2017, Level 5 Ceramics Award for Technical Excellence, Cardiff Metropolitan University

2016, The Morgen Hall Studentship Award, Cardiff Metropolitan University

2011, Outstanding Achievement in Ceramics, Ifield Community College

Publications

2017, #Cardiffmet Student Blogs, A New Perspective: My Field Module in South Korea, Cardiff Metropolitan University, http://studentblogs.cardiffmet.ac.uk/a-new-perspective-my-field-module-in-south-korea/

2018, #Cardiffmet Magazine, Issue 3, page 2-3, My South Korea Adventure, Cardiff Metropolitan University

Referees

Available upon request

Fluxes

Fluxes are substances, usually oxides, used in glazes and ceramic bodies to lower the high melting point of the main glass forming constituents, usually silica and alumina. Yet, because of their complex chemical makeup, most fluxes contribute qualities other than melting to the glaze. A ceramic flux functions by promoting partial or complete liquefaction. The most commonly used fluxing oxides in a ceramic glaze contain lead, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, barium, zinc, strontium, and manganese. These are introduced to the raw glaze as compounds, for example lead as lead oxide. Boron is considered by many to be a glass former rather than a flux.32313750_1939407732739044_4116687897942294528_n

Some oxides such as calcium flux significantly only at high temperature. Lead is the traditional low temperature flux, but it is now avoided because it is toxic even in small quantities. It is being replaced by other substances, especially boron and zinc.

In clay bodies a flux creates a limited and controlled amount of glass, which works to cement crystalline components together. Fluxes play a key role in the vitrification of clay bodies by reducing the overall melting point. The most common fluxes used in clay bodies are potassium oxide and sodium oxide which are found in feldspars. A predominant flux in glazes is calcium oxide which is usually obtained from limestone. The two most common feldspars in the ceramic industry are potash feldspar and soda feldspar.

Additions of different percentages (10%, 30%, 50%) of Borax Frit Standard, Calcium Borate Frit, High Alkaline Frit to Terracotta and Porcelain to three different temperatures (1080°C , 1180°C , 1280°C)

I began by drying some Terracotta and Porcelain as I would to reclaim it, and once they got to a bone dry stage I weigh them to 100g as then it would be an easy measurement to add the dry frits to in grams aswell.

The process then continued by adding water to the mixture and making sure they were thoroughly mixed together. Further, placing the mixtures onto plaster bats and processing them as if I would a clay body.

The tedious job of making consistent blobs and clear labeling was essential for the 60 samples as a way of knwoing what was what and what firings should be done.

Finally, I expected to have between 3-6 test kilns and all the firing would be done, but from my trial test, I quickly realised that the samples had to have more space in-between them especially the terracotta samples and samples going to higher temperature. You can see in the images bellow the tremendous amount of firings that went into this technical, plus remixing a few samples as they got stuck to either each other, the tray or the kiln shelf itself.

In addition, I mixed the three frits with water and fired them to the three different temperatures to observe how they would look on their own.

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Final Results of additions of Frits to Terracotta and Porcelain:

Tests on coiled pots:

1 – 1280°C High Alkaline Frit 50%

2 – 1280°C High Alkaline Frit 50%

3 – 1280°C Calcium Borate Frit 10%

4 – 1280°C Borax Frit Standard 30%

5 – 1180°C Borax Frit Standard 30%

6 – 1280°C Borax Frit Standard 50%

7 – 1280°C Borax Frit Standard 50%

8 – 1180°C Calcium Borate Frit 30%

9 – 1180°C Calcium Borate Frit 30%

10 – 1080°C Calcium Borate Frit 30%

11 – 1180°C High Alkaline Frit 50%

12 – 1180°C High Alkaline Frit 50%

 

Zoe Preece

As an artist Zoe is drawn to thresholds and to in between spaces.  The relationship between formal structure and transitory moments of flux, between restraint and fluidity are ever present in the works she creates.

In 2016, Zoe was awarded a Production Grant from the Arts Council of Wales to develop work towards a solo exhibition at Llantarnum Grange Arts Centre, opening 31st March 2018.  This body of work, titled Material Presence, exists as a series of works in conversation.  Taking notice of moments that might go unseen, they contemplate the meniscus on a spoon filled to the point of tipping, or the precarious balance of two cups stacked one on top of another on a kitchen surface, each on the brink of something.  There is an uncertain beauty Zoe recognises here and a longing that is resonant of human experience.  White porcelain clay becomes a metaphor, its movement between states, embodying aspects of human being.  Material and process take on significance for this reason, echoing the intent of the works.  Domestic objects – a colander, a saucepan, a skillet, mugs, cups, bowls – are carved from plaster, by hand or on a lathe, before being moulded and cast in porcelain.  Carving the handle of a mug or saucepan takes time and attention, and Zoe’s commitment to this process is a reflection of her feeling for the objects and their signification.  The porcelain forms are presented in simple arrangements reflective of those found on a kitchen surface.  Welling over the edge of a spoon, in the midst of these forms, is a pool of flux.

Material Presence seeks out a silent grace in the midst of the most mundane of domestic scenes – the washing up or a table part cleared – encouraging a sense of tenderness towards everyday experience.

An archive of longings (Material Presence), porcelain, flux, 2018

‘An archive of longings’ exists as a wall of spoons – as a recollection of and a longing for other states of being.  Some hold the original raw material from which their refined selves are made. Others contain a precise balance of porcelain and flux, caught in the heat of the kiln chamber in different stages of melt.

The way the earth remembers our bodies (Material Presence), CNC milled walnut, 2018

‘The way the earth remembers our bodies’ takes the form of a kitchen table made from walnut. The tabletop has been CNC milled from a 3D scan to reveal from within the wood surface a rucked tablecloth marked by dishes that once sat upon it, a knife, a spoon, and the remnants of food that has been eaten. The defining edges of the items on the table’s surface are blurred; the boundary between knife and tabletop unclear.

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Mia E Göransson

cargocollective.com/miaegoransson

“My work, a kind of depiction of nature, has increasingly come to be characterised by anxiety and threat,” says Mia E Göransson, who recently had her first solo show of ceramics in Italy. The Swedish artist and designer has been exhibiting regularly around the world since 2000, after graduating from Konstfack, the University of Art, Crafts and Design in Stockholm, in 1994.

The exhibition was an insight into the Göransson’s fascinating perspective on the ecosystems of everything from rocks and metaphysical architecture to cacti and small planets. Simply:

New Nature, in which shapes sourced from the natural environment are decontextualised and remixed to reveal the geometric lines, vortices and trajectories that inhabit the organic world. All made in ceramics, tension is created between the delicate transience and earthy eternalness of the material.

“Through the years, my courage to let myself be led by gut instinct and intuition has increased, which has made my design more abstract,” she also told The Fifty Fifty Projects. Not unlike Kandinsky, Göransson uses colour, geometry and irregularity to achieve abstraction. ”The results are

not always beautiful, often quite ambiguous, sometimes a bit dirty, something both the rub and seductive,” she goes on.

With a surreal and playful spirit, the abstracted forms and colours give rise to unusual objects.  The objects are arranged in complex installations that could just as soon be interpreted as children’s games, or “small models of enigmatic cities of the future”.